David Hockney at Tate Britain




david-hockney-pop-art
One of the most popular and influential British artists of the twentieth century returns to Tate Britain for his most comprehensive exhibition yet.

This exhibition gathers together an extensive selection of David Hockney’s most famous works celebrating his achievements in painting, drawing, print, photography and video across six decades.

As he approaches his 80th birthday, Hockney continues to change his style and ways of working, embracing new technologies as he goes. From his portraits and images of Los Angeles swimming pools, through to his drawings and photography, Yorkshire landscapes and most recent paintings – some of which have never been seen before in public – this exhibition shows how the roots of each new direction lay in the work that came before. A once-in-a-lifetime chance to see these unforgettable works together.

See more: tate.org.uk

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UK City of Culture: Hull launch night draws crowd of 60,000

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About 60,000 people came out in Hull to watch a fireworks display and light show to mark the start of the city’s year as UK Capital of Culture.

Organisers of the event think tens of thousands more watched the spectacle from viewpoints across the north and south bank on Sunday evening.

Crowds gathered in Queen Victoria Square to watch video projections on City Hall and surrounding buildings.

The films explored Hull’s history, from the Blitz to sporting triumphs.

The fireworks were due to start at 20:17, but were delayed by about five minutes.

The Hull City of Culture team said the delay was to allow extra time for those with tickets to get on to the marina.
(…)

Read more: BBC News




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Personalized Portraits Christmas gift now available!!!

Order now to avoid disappointment

– During the Christmas period we need one week order –

You can collect the portraits on Saturdays at Greenwich Market

gift-christmas




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One Penny Black stamp

Pop Art painting of Queen Elizabeth II stamp remembering the famous “One Penny Black stamp”.

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The Penny Black was the world’s first adhesive postage stamp used in a public postal system. It first was issued in Great Britain on 1 May 1840, for official use from 6 May of that year. It features a profile of Queen Victoria.

In 1837, British postal rates were high, complex and anomalous. To simplify matters, Sir Rowland Hill proposed an adhesive stamp to indicate pre-payment of postage. At the time it was normal for the recipient to pay postage on delivery, charged by the sheet and on distance travelled. By contrast, the Penny Black allowed letters of up to 1⁄2 ounce (14 grams) to be delivered at a flat rate of one penny, regardless of distance.

Postal delivery systems using what may have been adhesive stamps existed before the Penny Black. The idea had at least been suggested earlier in the Austrian Empire, Sweden, and possibly Greece.

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THE EY EXHIBITION: THE WORLD GOES POP

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Whaaam! Pop! Kapow! This is pop art, but not as you know it.

Tate Modern is ready to tell a global story of pop art, breaking new ground along the way, and revealing a different side to the artistic and cultural phenomenon.

From Latin America to Asia, and from Europe to the Middle East, this explosive exhibition connects the dots between art produced around the world during the 1960s and 1970s, showing how different cultures and countries responded to the movement.

Politics, the body, domestic revolution, consumption, public protest, and folk – all will be explored and laid bare in eye-popping Technicolor and across many media, from canvas to car bonnets and pinball machines.

The exhibition will reveal how pop was never just a celebration of western consumer culture, but was often a subversive international language of protest – a language that is more relevant today than ever.

See more at: Tate




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